Always got makeup on your clothes? You need to know this!

Getting makeup on your clothes, for most of us, in an inevitable part of life.

Even if you go makeup free for the day, your best pal giving you a hug can result in foundation marks all over your crisp white shirt.

But fret not, as there is a way to remove stubborn makeup stains from your favourite clothes.
Here’s what you need to know:

Foundation is often oil based and designed to be long lasting, hence why it can be hard to remove from fabric fibre once it rubs off your face onto your shirt collar.

Seeing as makeup is created with pigments and oils designed to be long lasting on the skin, they’re often hard to budge from clothes, too.

It’s important to treat the stain as fast as you can to avoid it settling in and use a detergent that targets greasy stains.

Nonetheless, there should be a way to get your gowns good as new.

For foundation, mascara, lipstick, sunscreen or eyeshadow, pre-treat with a powerful detergent such as and pour enough directly onto the stain, to cover it.
Spread it over the stain with the pre-treat cap.

Then dose with a detergent that specifically target tough greasy stains, but also enhance your whites to leave them bright and pristine, and set your wash on the warmest temperature allowed as per the garment’s care label.

With any item, you should always check the label before you put it in the wash.
So when you get lipstick on your velvet dress, ensure you check it out before just throwing it in.

If your new velvet jacket says dry clean only, it’s probably pure velvet, made from cotton or silk, so don’t clean it yourself just to be safe!
Some velvets are safe to wash however, such as crushed velvet and polyester blend velvets made from an easy-care fabric.
It’s important to always check washing instructions on delicate items.

Depending on the label instructions, it can be preferable to wash velvets on a cooler temperature, to avoid shrinkage or affecting the shape or delicate fibres.

Turn the item inside out to avoid fibre abrasion and try a detergent that removes greasy cosmetic stains, but on a cool wash, to keep your fabrics intact.

There’s also the hairspray method!

Grab any hairspray you can find and spray it onto the stain – it doesn’t even matter if it’s a fresh stain or not. Let the product settle for about 5 minutes before taking a wet tissue to wipe away the product. The hairspray will dissolve the chemicals of the lipstick, and get rid of the bulk of it.

After that, run the fabric under cold water before ending it off with a rinse of warm water. This removes any remaining product and pigment on the fabric!

Using makeup wipes for powder products!

By powder pigment, we’re talking about your eyeshadows, your blushers, and your bronzing powders. Using makeup wipes to remove these powder-based makeup stains is a trick that has long been used backstage at major fashion shows. It’s so simple and requires very little of your time.

First, remove any excess powder pigments from the fabric by gently sweeping it away. After that, take a piece of makeup wipe and gently dab it onto the stained area. If the stain persists, take a cotton ball and use a makeup remover solution and repeat the same steps. To end it off, run the fabric under cold water to completely remove remaining pigments.

You can use makeup remover liquid too.

Shaving cream works?

Shaving cream is another product known to remove the toughest of stains! First, apply shaving cream onto stained area.

Let the product soak for about 10 minutes before applying dabbing motions to the area. You might want to use a bit of strength to see effective results.

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